We intend to create a world where everyone will enjoy our games without exception.

2012/05/14

Working on The Charlatan

Filed under: The Charlatan @ 11:44

2012/05/12

Protected: The Charlatan : Indiecade Download Links

Filed under: The Charlatan @ 22:28

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2012/05/08

Defending Vikingr

Filed under: Vikingr — Tags: @ 22:29

Many Happymakers recently defended their graduate theses in the USC Interactive Media Division. I was among them. Click to hear a discussion of the problems of historiography and adaptation I encountered, and the approach I developed to solve them!

2012/04/30

Defending The Moonlighters

Filed under: The Moonlighters — Tags: @ 19:28

Many Happymakers recently defended their graduate theses in the USC Interactive Media Division. I was among them. Click to hear a discussion of Narrative Listening, the new adaptive narrative system hiding inside The Moonlighters.

2012/04/14

Redesigning Vikingr

Filed under: Vikingr — Tags: , , , @ 16:59

Today, I changed the project description on Vikingr!. These alterations to the project’s mission occurred in the week before the winter show, and they go deep. Months of local optimization on the problem of making a fun game about Vikings had failed to produce an enjoyable experience, so at my wife’s behest I undertook a challenge: Use this final week to start from scratch and make something enjoyable that addressed the whole scope of Viking life.

I’m very glad I did. I threw out the notion of producing a “Dwarf Fortress, but with Vikings and social play” and focused on moment-to-moment pleasures: busy hands in home life (no more setting up situations and waiting for things to happen), sailing with multitouch controls, raiding without complex strategy and micromanagement. I went to a side view with simple sprites (except for the Mode 7-style sailing, inspired by Final Fantasy VI) rather than the isometric projection. I switched to Unity3D so I could get things going quickly and discourage myself from over-reliance on native user interface elements (or, indeed, from fiddling with them to no end). These changes dramatically improved my project’s forward velocity, people enjoyed playing my game more, and I was in a better position to put more social interactions into gameplay.

It seems counter-intuitive that moving towards simple and superficial could make the rich social exchanges I had hoped for more feasible, but it boiled down to the observation my wife had made: If I had spent six months working on home life and farming in such exquisite(-ly boring) detail, there were simply not enough months until May to do the same for sailing, raiding, and social life. I had over-modeled one portion of my game—and not even the important portion, at that! Now that my world signals simplicity, I can employ much simpler types of social exchange without causing inconsistencies in player experience.

So, that’s where Vikingr stands right now. I am currently fleshing it out and extending it with additional social exchanges—not trying to cram sociality into an asocial design.

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